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The colors we see in the rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet.

Many of us have witnessed a rainbow, a common natural phenomenon, when the sun begins to shine after a period of rain. The rainbow includes a spectrum of light that appears in the sky as a result of the reflection, refraction, and scattering of light in water droplets. The seven main colors we see in the rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. However, we never see colors like black, white, or gray in rainbows.

According to a report published in Scientific Report, “but there are two colors we would never see in a rainbow – black and white. Black is the absence of color – it’s what we see when there is no light at all. On the other hand, white is a combination of all colors together. When light is refracted by raindrops, it separates white light in the visible spectrum, which means it is not whiter. Gray is a mixture of black and white, and since we can never see black and white in a rainbow, neither can we see the colors created by mixing them.”

According to National geographic, When sunlight hits a rain droplet, some of the light is reflected. The electromagnetic spectrum is made up of light with many different wavelengths, and each is reflected at a different angle. Thus, the spectrum is separated, producing a rainbow. Red has the longest wavelength of visible light, about 650 nanometers.

The outlet further explains that “a rainbow is an optical illusion – it doesn’t actually exist in a specific place in the sky. How a rainbow looks depends on where where you are standing and where the sun (or other light source) is shining.”

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A report explains the absence of black, white and gray in the rainbow

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